Children of this Land by Saher Nassar

$ 80.00

Posters for Gaza: Children of this Land (2024) by Saher Nassar
42 x 30 cm
FineArt archival paper, 230 gsm

Shipping and Delivery

  • $30 flat fee for local delivery within Dubai (3-5 days)
  • $95 flat fee for international shipping (7-10 days)
  • Ships unframed

Proceeds from the online poster sale will provide much-needed medical aid to affected children in Gaza, through The Palestine Red Crescent Society.

 

The project launched by Zawyeh Gallery, ‘Posters for Gaza’ aims to shed light on the ethnic cleansing and horrific massacres inflicted on the Gaza Strip demanding cease fire and the recognition of Palestinian rights to live freely on their land with dignity.

Representing a long tradition in Palestinian history, political posters were produced extensively in the seventies and the eighties by the Palestinian Liberation Organization with the contribution of Palestinian, Arab, and international artists. Posters played a crucial role then in supporting the justice of the Palestinian cause and promoting it globally, guided by freedom, dignity, resilience, and the ongoing aspiration for independence, sought by Palestinians.

Saher Nassar was born in Palestine in 1986. After graduating from the University of Hertfordshire, England, he started a career in illustration and graphic design, working for various renowned media and design institutions in the UAE. It didn’t take long before he changed course and embarked on his practice as an independent artist. His artistic approach to subject matters is fundamentally influenced by contemporary political and social conflicts. He uses various visual mediums and disciplines to showcase his work. Nassar has participated in several solo and group exhibitions and was commissioned by various art institutes in UAE. His most recent show at Art Dubai, titled “Residue,” was a comic portrayal of tyranny and the abuse of power represented by soldiers, a body of work that reflected an act of childishness amidst exploitation, where the residual innocence of childhood is manifested as a juxtaposition of violence.